Tag: Arcola Theatre

Cast announced for Insignificance

Cast announced for Insignificance

The exciting cast have now been announced for the first London revival in over 20 years of Insignificance by two-time Olivier Award winner Terry Johnson. Alice Bailey Johnson, Simon Rouse, Tom Mannion and Oliver Hembrough will bring this hilarious and bittersweet comedy to life on stage at the Arcola Theatre.

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Review: Thrill Me

Review: Thrill Me

A crime of passion, entered into without thought of the consequence, but not unknowingly or even unwillingly. As long as Nathan Leopold (Harry Downes) commits himself to Richard Loeb (Ellis Dackombe) and his twisted fantasies, he will have everything he wants – the man of his dreams. Stephen Dolginoff’s Thrill Me cleverly captures the various shades of darkness inherent within his two characters, a two-hander that balances intelligence and emotion.

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News: CASA Festival celebrates 10 years in Two London Venues

News: CASA Festival celebrates 10 years in Two London Venues

For its tenth anniversary year, CASA Festival joins forces with two of London’s leading off-West End theatres Southwark Playhouse and Arcola Theatre to offer London audiences eight weeks of brilliant Latin American theatre and culture.

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 Review: Richard III

 Review: Richard III

All the kings are dead; all the heirs are gone too – this is a particularly bloody time in royal history. It all centres around Richard III (Greg Hicks), the Machiavellian hunchback that lets no-one stop him take the crown for himself, albeit for an all too brief time of two years. Richard is known to many as the hunchback, the king with such obvious deformity as does not befit his status.

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Review: The Pulverised

Review: The Pulverised

For further information about The Pulverised, see the accompanying news article, or a feature interview with director Andy Sava.


In an abstract sense, it feels as though an apocalypse is approaching. In reality, it is simply the devastating onslaught of globalisation. Four individuals experience this in The Pulverised – they don’t meet, but are nevertheless connected by the same French telecommunications company that shall remain nameless (mainly because it isn’t ever identified). As each individual tries desperately to conform to the standardised corporate blueprint, the cracks begin to show. No mistakes; no slip-ups; no life outside of the job to distract from your purpose. They are pulverised by the space in Lucy Phelps translation of Alexandra Badea’s award-winning script.

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