Review: Three Mothers

Review: Three Mothers

Three Mothers, each with three stories; three relationships with their children; three reflections on their sense of belonging, of home – more specifically, on migration. One is a mother who sends her son away for a better life; one who herself returns to where she grew up; one is running away from her homeland to her motherland with her precious babe.

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Review: Insignificance

Review: Insignificance

We all know who these characters are, but they’re never named, so in theory they could be anyone. A professor (Simon Rouse) whose theory of relativity transformed the scientific field; an actress (Alice Bailey Johnson) instantly recognisable for her platinum blonde hair, white dress and signature beauty spot; a baseball player (Oliver Hembrough) who married the actress and has a nasty temper; a senator (Tom Mannion) who uses bullying, machismo tactics to get what he wants.

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Review: Tryst

Review: Tryst

Tryst: A private, romantic rendezvous between two lovers, conducted with no one else’s knowledge. Perhaps they wouldn’t approve, perhaps they would recognise the affair for what it is – a predatory act from a man to con a woman out of her worldly possessions. That’s why George Love (Fred Perry) keeps his business a secret at least – Perry is a weasel, a smarmy character out only for himself and convincingly greasy in his underhanded intentions. He is less convincing as the faux romantic, a pretence to marry Adelaide Pinchin (Natasha J Barnes) and cheat her out of some inheritance. It’s meant to feel forced and false, but it doesn’t translate with conviction onstage.

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Review: All The Little Lights

Review: All The Little Lights

It all feels like a childish game, a competition as to who can impress the other the most. Joanne (Tessie Orange-Turner) is in charge, the alpha female that demands attention and uses playground bullying tactics to ensure she remains at the top of the tree. Youngest of the pack Amy (Esther-Grace Button) is in many ways the most intelligent, lacking in social skills but full of factual knowledge. Every time she throws out a surprisingly clever retort, she is violently beaten down so that Joanne (Orange-Turner) can maintain control.

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Hamza Mohsin and The Ends, “I want to draw new audiences into the theatre”

Hamza Mohsin and The Ends, “I want to draw new audiences into the theatre”

Camden, London – A new play set on the mean streets. Three stories filled with revenge, revelation and redemption collide on a fateful night.

The Ends is a bold and emotional story of lives that collide in an unexpected act of violence. Inventively structured as a triptych of overlapping and intersecting narratives, The Ends explores the lives of disparate characters who are catapulted into unforeseen dramatic situations instigated by actions taken decades before.

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