Review: All The Little Lights

Review: All The Little Lights

It all feels like a childish game, a competition as to who can impress the other the most. Joanne (Tessie Orange-Turner) is in charge, the alpha female that demands attention and uses playground bullying tactics to ensure she remains at the top of the tree. Youngest of the pack Amy (Esther-Grace Button) is in many ways the most intelligent, lacking in social skills but full of factual knowledge. Every time she throws out a surprisingly clever retort, she is violently beaten down so that Joanne (Orange-Turner) can maintain control.

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Hamza Mohsin and The Ends, “I want to draw new audiences into the theatre”

Hamza Mohsin and The Ends, “I want to draw new audiences into the theatre”

Camden, London – A new play set on the mean streets. Three stories filled with revenge, revelation and redemption collide on a fateful night.

The Ends is a bold and emotional story of lives that collide in an unexpected act of violence. Inventively structured as a triptych of overlapping and intersecting narratives, The Ends explores the lives of disparate characters who are catapulted into unforeseen dramatic situations instigated by actions taken decades before.

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Review: 31 Hours

Review: 31 Hours

It can take just three hours from the point of impact to service being resumed, depending on the severity of the casualty. The team come in and clean up with efficiency and professionalism – make safe and wipe clean, as if nothing has ever happened. All we hear about though are the complaints from angry commuters; the delayed journeys that occur when someone commits suicide on the railways. It happens every 31 Hours on average. Yet Kieran Knowles’ insightful show focusses not on those who moan about the loss of life, but on those whose job it is to clean it up, remove all trace and get the railways up and running again. A thankless job indeed, but one that is aptly paid homage to in Abigail Graham’s brutally honest and heartfelt production.

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Review: Big Foot

Review: Big Foot

Joseph Barnes Phillips launches into a monologue with gusto, transitioning between numerous characters in a portrayal of love and loss on a personal level. Big Foot, both written and performed by Phillips, has a down to earth, refreshing reality about it. But it also paints a beautiful picture of a young man trying to step up and be the responsible individual that society has too easily painted him to eschew.

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Review: The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll & My Hyde

Review: The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll & My Hyde

Nick Lane’s adaptation of Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic Gothic tale is well suited to the stage – The Strange Case Of Dr Jekyll & Mr Hyde is expanded to provide more substantial ancillary characters. But the new narrative also sheds some light on the mysterious inner workings of both Jekyll and Hyde (artfully characterised by Jack Bannell). In this version, we have Jekyll disappearing entirely and Hyde unable to survive without him – the light is a necessity for the dark to exist.

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