Tag: Southwark Playhouse

Review: Doubt, A Parable

Review: Doubt, A Parable

Sheila Atim’s twentieth century-inspired composition adds an eerie ethereal atmosphere to the lofty space, a sanctitude for Sister Aloysius (Stella Gonet) and the teachers at her church school. Aloysius is a matron of the olden days, a stern hand to keep children and staff members alike in line. Gonet immediately strikes with a sharp, no nonsense attitude and a darkly comedic, suspicious nature to match. Five minutes in to a combination of John Patrick Shanley’s purposeful script with Chè Walker’s acute eye and we are transported. It’s exactly the kind of unrelenting impetus that makes Doubt, A Parable such powerful work.

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Review: The Superhero

Review: The Superhero

The Superhero brings with it high expectations after Joseph Finlay and Richy Hughes won the 2015 Stiles and Drewe Best New Song Award with “Don’t Look Down”. It’s easy to see why – the song combines all the expected elements into a magical finale number. A catchy melody with punchy, staccato chorus; intricate lyrical poetry that fuses comedy, pathos and emotional depth.

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News: CASA Festival celebrates 10 years in Two London Venues

News: CASA Festival celebrates 10 years in Two London Venues

For its tenth anniversary year, CASA Festival joins forces with two of London’s leading off-West End theatres Southwark Playhouse and Arcola Theatre to offer London audiences eight weeks of brilliant Latin American theatre and culture.

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Review: Working

Review: Working

A stonemason or a delivery boy; a cocktail waitress or a trucker. Whether they be a housewife or factory worker or retiree, the ordinary man is often overlooked. Working is a musical for the layperson, a window into the thoughts of the everyday 1970s American, as interviewed by Studs Terkel in his book of the same name. The beauty of Luke Sheppard’s production is that it loses none of its grass roots charm. As a musical narrative, Stephen Schwartz’s adaptation is found wanting; as a collection of memories and experiences reminding us of the masses that keep the world turning, it’s a complete triumph.

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Exeunt Review: The Island

Exeunt Review: The Island

Originally published by Exeunt


Shovel, tip, repeat. The monotony on Robben Island continues, a worthless activity that Winston (Edward Dede) and John (Mark Springer) carry out simply because they looked the wrong way at a prison guard that morning. In the first fifteen minutes of The Island, John Terry highlights the crushing futility of existence as Winston and John labour to physical exhaustion.

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