Category: Edinburgh Fringe

Edinburgh Review: Britney in: John

Edinburgh Review: Britney in: John

It’s a road trip for Ellen Robertson and Charly Clive as they take to North America after school in the pursuit of John Hancock. He seems like as good a subject as any for their award-winning documentary film, footage that they show throughout Britney in: John. In truth, the footage is not going to win any prizes or an audience with David Attenborough any time soon. But Robertson and Clive know that – it’s a point of comedic value throughout the show. Ultimately, they went travelling with focus, an aim to interview men named John Hancock (after the founding father) and see whether the result paints a picture of the American societal norm. Britney in: John does not provide an exposé on the American archetypal identity, but it does provide for an amusing theatrical production.

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Edinburgh Review: Quarter Life Crisis

Edinburgh Review: Quarter Life Crisis

Alicia (Yolanda Mercy) understands the millennials – swipe left/ swipe right, talk in emojis and never pay full price. Her life is one of discounted responsibilities and disengaged apathy. If Mum doesn’t know the answer, then Siri or Google will. She goes to lectures and has a computer to dictate her notes, so she can nap. But she’s sharp, she’s funny and she spouts words of truth like a preacher who we all pay rapt attention to. Mercy gets the disillusioned twenty-somethings; we are promised that life will be easy but in reality, we face a future with no clear direction.

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Edinburgh Review: Good Girl

Edinburgh Review: Good Girl

At ten years old, GG (Naomi Sheldon) is of the impression that in order to be liked, she has to be a Good Girl. She’s at the county swimming championships and her coach is telling her to keep going, like a good girl. It’s such an awkward comment to make given today’s climate – the sinister connotations are hard to miss, despite it simply being a platitude of encouragement. But such an innocuous phrase seems to set up the remainder of GG’s emotional life, sticking in her mind at a pivotal developmental point for any child. Sheldon’s script tackles the damage caused simply by being anxious to fit in, to conform, to be a Good Girl.

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Edinburgh Review: Buzz

Edinburgh Review: Buzz

Buzz has a Legally Blonde flair, albeit with a more adult theme than going to law school to win back your man, before realising you’re better than him. Self-confidence and feminism are still the main messages to come out of the show, but it’s more a case of not needing man’s little friend when you’ve got your own bigger, battery operated version. Main protagonist Angie (Allie Munro) starts by getting dumped, ends by chucking ex-boyfriend Mark (George Lock) to the kerb in favour of her very own Anne Summers. It may sound cheesy – in many ways it is – but the feel-good, love yourself factor is what makes Buzz so pleasurable.

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Edinburgh Review: Reuben Kaye – 5 STAR SHOW

Edinburgh Review: Reuben Kaye – 5 STAR SHOW

If you find yourself anywhere in the vicinity of Reuben Kaye when he is performing, run. Run fast and don’t look back. If you make eye contact and the divine devil that is Kaye himself engages you with a sinister smirk, a heavily eyelashed wink and a seductive smile, you are lost to us all. His façade is an expressive cross between Liza Minnelli & Jack Nicholson and it’s been the end of many a man.

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