Tag: Exeunt

Exeunt Review: The Island

Exeunt Review: The Island

Originally published by Exeunt


Shovel, tip, repeat. The monotony on Robben Island continues, a worthless activity that Winston (Edward Dede) and John (Mark Springer) carry out simply because they looked the wrong way at a prison guard that morning. In the first fifteen minutes of The Island, John Terry highlights the crushing futility of existence as Winston and John labour to physical exhaustion.

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Exeunt Review: Chinglish

Exeunt Review: Chinglish

Originally published by Exeunt


The ever-increasing number of businesses tending towards globalisation indicates that the advantage of speaking multiple languages is becoming less and less important. Business is still mainly conducted in English and doesn’t look to be shifting any time soon. Signs in multiple countries provide dual translation to appeal to a growing, more mobile tourist market; native languages now have to share space with an invasive, more commonly understandable alternative. But China is still a world power that conducts much of its business in its variety of native tongues – the sheer size of the country stubbornly resists what may be an inevitable global shift to a single method of communication. Chairman Mao’s simplification of the traditional Chinese characters could be perceived to open the doors to foreign commerce, but was initially implemented to increase literacy and enable The Cultural Revolution to stride forward faster.

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Exeunt Review: An Evening With An Immigrant

Exeunt Review: An Evening With An Immigrant

Originally published by Exeunt


Nigeria; London; Dublin; back to London – as a child, Inua Ellams and his family were passed from pillar to post. Living everywhere and belonging nowhere, Ellams discusses the feeling of being lost, afraid and alone in his one-man spoken word show An Evening With An Immigrant. Now he has a UK Visa, Indefinite Leave To Remain (ILR), but twelve years of fighting and appealing The Home Office to achieve this status has left its scars. From middle class in Nigeria to penniless in Peckham, Ellams shares his stories and releases his pent-up fears through spoken word – it’s the cheapest way for him to be free.

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Exeunt Review: Labels

Originally published on Exeunt


Joe Sellman-Leava opens Labels with quotes from Nigel Farage, Katie Hopkins, Nick Griffin, Idi Amin and Donald Trump, to name but a few. In the first two minutes the audience are hit with a barrage of racial abuse, mandates to force out the immigrants and send them back as if trying to prevent an alien invasion. Independence Day, this is not.

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