Tag: Stomping Ground Festival

Stomping Ground Festival 2017 Round-Up

Stomping Ground Festival 2017 Round-Up

Another festival complete, Stomping Ground at The Albany having given opportunity to nine emerging directors as part of the StoneCrabs Theatre Young Directors Training Programme.

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AYT Review: The Open Couple

AYT Review: The Open Couple

Also published on A Younger Theatre


Here we have a squabbling couple, going through marital difficulties. The premise for Dario Fo’s The Open Couple may seem fairly typical for a play, but the solution in this case is somewhat different. Alan Ayckbourn, this is not. Matter of fact funny, Rebecca Crankshaw and Pete Picton are in a constant battle of melodrama – Crankshaw decides to kill herself by overdosing on Skittles (they resemble pills), shoot herself with a hairdryer (it resembles a gun) and jump to her death standing on a chair (it resembles a window). Picton is having several affairs, a midlife crisis without needing any blue pills to bolster his libido. The solution, an open marriage that ends up giving Crankshaw her confidence back and reducing Picton to the snivelling worm he is.

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AYT Review: After Liverpool

AYT Review: After Liverpool

Also published on A Younger Theatre


After Liverpool has nothing to do with the city in North West England – it’s best to reveal that detail straightaway so there are no misconceptions of scousers with their hair in rollers, jacking up cars and trying to nick their wheels (stereotype alert). Hollie Hales and Stephen Papaioannou ask questions, short and sharp and direct. Answers, they don’t seem to matter. Deep and meaningful conversation, that’s not important. Similar interests are few and far between – these are simply superficial facts anyway. Where are the details? What is this play about? Does it actually matter??

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AYT Review: Captain Amazing

AYT Review: Captain Amazing

Also published on A Younger Theatre


This is the story of a superhero and a puppet. Like all good stories, it needs a good guy and a bad guy, a villain hell bent on destroying the world with his nuclear missile. Mark (Adam Trussell) is both of these characters and more, until an unwanted pregnancy comes along. Suddenly he is both a superhero and a dad, having to think about responsibilities and teach daughter Emily (puppet by Jessica Warshaw) about the world. Mother and father grow apart, Mark struggles to cope with the pressure – these are problems that can’t be disintegrated with laser beams that come from your eyes. Alistair McDowall’s Captain Amazing switches between fantasy and fatherhood, a surrealist tale that centres itself inside Mark’s head.

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AYT Review: Boxman

AYT Review: Boxman

Also published on A Younger Theatre


In arguably the most challenging production seen at the festival so far, Boxman is a one-man show. 45 minutes focussed around Ringo (Reice Weathers), a homeless man fled from his war-stricken country to live on the streets, a favourable and more affluent alternative to forced militia. His home has no walls, but similarly provides safety and protection from the uncertainty of the outside world. He regresses to a child-like state, talking to a shadow and a torch that act as his inner conscious, his spirit guide to process the events that have unfolded. But this is a show is which a lot of storytelling happens, yet lacks enough accompanying changes in production to emphasise each point.

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