Tag: Max Dorey

Review: Insignificance

Review: Insignificance

We all know who these characters are, but they’re never named, so in theory they could be anyone. A professor (Simon Rouse) whose theory of relativity transformed the scientific field; an actress (Alice Bailey Johnson) instantly recognisable for her platinum blonde hair, white dress and signature beauty spot; a baseball player (Oliver Hembrough) who married the actress and has a nasty temper; a senator (Tom Mannion) who uses bullying, machismo tactics to get what he wants.

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Review: All The Little Lights

Review: All The Little Lights

It all feels like a childish game, a competition as to who can impress the other the most. Joanne (Tessie Orange-Turner) is in charge, the alpha female that demands attention and uses playground bullying tactics to ensure she remains at the top of the tree. Youngest of the pack Amy (Esther-Grace Button) is in many ways the most intelligent, lacking in social skills but full of factual knowledge. Every time she throws out a surprisingly clever retort, she is violently beaten down so that Joanne (Orange-Turner) can maintain control.

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Review: LUV

Review: LUV

Published with thanks to Theatre Bloggers, #LDNTheatreBloggers;

Q&A with thanks to Terri Paddock


This is the second production about love that has premiered in London only this week. Neither production resembles what can be stereotypically considered to be associated with feelings of love, of devotion or of the deepest sense of caring. The first, Love at the Dorfman expertly displays an uglier side, a conscious decision to stay together for better or for worse. The second, Buckland Theatre Company’s second production at the Park Theatre this year, revives Murray Schisgal’s original Tony-winning Broadway production and examines how fickle an emotion love can sometimes be. Director Gary Condes and actor Charles Dorfman honour the original era and setting of LUV, reiterating its message in a theatre scene where traditional absurdist plays are seen less and less often.

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TRH Review: No Villain

TRH Review: No Villain

Originally published on The Reviews Hub


Awarded 3 stars – Old-fashioned

After its highly successful run at the Old Red Lion Theatre last year, there was much to expect from No Villain, the newly unearthed seminal work from one of the 20th Century’s great playwrights. This Arthur Miller play more transparently holds a mirror up to his own life in comparison with much of his later work. It isn’t difficult to see a caricature of Miller himself in the middle child, Arnold (Alex Forsyth), a progressive thinker and creative spirit in a world of industry at the height of its manufacturing power. Sean Turner’s production has an undercurrent of unrest at its heart, a bubbling tension that the failing family business only serves to exacerbate.
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