Tag: Tristan Bates Theatre

AYT Review: The Collective Project

AYT Review: The Collective Project

Originally published on A Younger Theatre


12 days, eight shows, one director – The Pensive Federation celebrates its fifth anniversary with a series of showcase pieces that are written, rehearsed and performed in such a short space of time. Two groups of actors are brought onside to perform four shows each, giving 12 days for 48 minutes of material. Of course, an appreciation for the short timeframe can be allowed for each show; nevertheless the material presents a wide range of capabilities from actors and writers alike.

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Review: Scenes from the End

Review: Scenes from the End

The emotional potential of an opera aria, or even a lament, is perfectly placed to convey the anguish and nonsense surrounding grief – a concept that is ultimately impossible to describe despite death being an inevitable and necessary part of life, a means by which it is defined. Performer Héloïse Werner performs three interrelated scenarios to Jonathan Woolgar’s Scenes from the End, in which grief acts as the central force driving the singer through the show yet allowing her pause to stop and question the absurdity of it all.

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AYT Review: The Slave

AYT Review: The Slave

Originally published on A Younger Theatre


Walker Vessels (Stanley J Browne) opens The Slave with a monologue that demonstrates timeless wisdom – a sage delivery written in a rhythmic verse bearing resemblance to many Shakespearean equivalents. Othello and Richard III spring to mind, characters judged by their non-conforming looks more than their intellect or character. As LeRoi Jones’ intense 70 minute play continues, Vessels reveals himself to be both intelligent and passionate, enraged by the continuing discrimination of black society in modern America. Contemporary at least when it was written; protests and guns and Sophie Thomas’ design are evocative of a 1960s apartheid town, combining elements of colour and hipster chic with industrial concrete and wooden structures that hint at the dystopian present within. But The Slave, despite its divided and politically charged subject material, never really conjures up the intensity that the situation demands.
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TRH Review: Blue On Blue

TRH Review: Blue On Blue

Originally published on The Reviews Hub


Awarded 2 1/2 stars – Beige

“I’m not on my own! I’m stuck in ’ere with a failed burglar!” The relationship between disabled army veteran Moss (Darren Swift) and ‘nephew’ Carter (Daniel Gentely) is anything but smooth. But, despite their constant arguing, it is clear that Carter and Moss are close. So close in fact that both of them are attempting to covet the healthcare assistant Marta (Ida Bonnast), who comes to the council flat once a week. Unfortunately, Carter’s attempts don’t quite go exactly to plan, but Moss is there to pick him back up from the ground. In fact, when Moss (Swift) enters in the last scene of Blue on Blue sporting his two army medals, a feeling of pride swells through the audience. Chips Hardy writes Blue on Blue as a dark comedy that deals with issues of disability, both physical and mental.
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