Tag: The Albany

AYT Review: The Open Couple

AYT Review: The Open Couple

Also published on A Younger Theatre


Here we have a squabbling couple, going through marital difficulties. The premise for Dario Fo’s The Open Couple may seem fairly typical for a play, but the solution in this case is somewhat different. Alan Ayckbourn, this is not. Matter of fact funny, Rebecca Crankshaw and Pete Picton are in a constant battle of melodrama – Crankshaw decides to kill herself by overdosing on Skittles (they resemble pills), shoot herself with a hairdryer (it resembles a gun) and jump to her death standing on a chair (it resembles a window). Picton is having several affairs, a midlife crisis without needing any blue pills to bolster his libido. The solution, an open marriage that ends up giving Crankshaw her confidence back and reducing Picton to the snivelling worm he is.

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AYT Review: Captain Amazing

AYT Review: Captain Amazing

Also published on A Younger Theatre


This is the story of a superhero and a puppet. Like all good stories, it needs a good guy and a bad guy, a villain hell bent on destroying the world with his nuclear missile. Mark (Adam Trussell) is both of these characters and more, until an unwanted pregnancy comes along. Suddenly he is both a superhero and a dad, having to think about responsibilities and teach daughter Emily (puppet by Jessica Warshaw) about the world. Mother and father grow apart, Mark struggles to cope with the pressure – these are problems that can’t be disintegrated with laser beams that come from your eyes. Alistair McDowall’s Captain Amazing switches between fantasy and fatherhood, a surrealist tale that centres itself inside Mark’s head.

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AYT Review: The End Of All Miracles

AYT Review: The End Of All Miracles

Also published on A Younger Theatre


They enter in high spirits, partying through life to their wheelchairs. As the music fades, only the remnants of the celebration remain, the leftovers of two lives as they reflect in their twilight years. Both He (Peter McVea) and She (Bridget Wood) have limited memories to cling back to as they debate the choices they made in life – ultimately are memories more important than the life lived itself? The whole performance has a farcical nature to it that juxtaposes the serious conversations had between the married couple. But in the end the concept is too superficial, lacking depth or meaning, which simply results in a disjointed, inconceivable hour of theatre that lacks in a journey, or a direction.

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AYT Review: Counting Stars

AYT Review: Counting Stars

Also published on A Younger Theatre


Sophie (Rebecca Omogbehin) and Abiodun (Joseph Rowe) never directly interact, confined as they are to their separate nightclub toilets. But there is a natural partnership between them, a deep-rooted affection that makes for a set of endearing conversations. The whole production has a light-hearted tone, a gentle comedy that instils empathy on both the workers, before it slowly descends into the nightmare they both wished never to have faced. The build-up is there, but the final climactic moment is lacking in this otherwise affable duologue of characters trying to get by in the world.

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