Tag: Stomping Ground Festival

AYT Review: Passing By

AYT Review: Passing By

Also published on A Younger Theatre


Nowadays, no festival programme is complete without a LGBTQ production, so engrained as they are in modern day society. For me, that’s a wonderful thing, highlighting and debating previously taboo issues with new vigour and fervour. Passing By however, whilst focussing around two gay men, is not in and of itself about homosexual affairs – Martin Sherman’s script could easily be about any two lovers, ships that pass in the night and form an instant connection. This production is the theatrical dating app, Happn.

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AYT Review: Wasted

AYT Review: Wasted

Also published on A Younger Theatre


Kate Tempest’s spoken word script flows like water out of the mouths of the actors, gently cascading between the three as they recite different parts of her poetry during the transition scenes. Face-on with the audience, they observe, dissect and analyse the difficulties of today’s 20-something professional, living in London with little money and a general feeling of discontent and dissatisfaction – #firstworldproblems. Beth Kapila treats the individuals as a unit, requires them to be so in sync with each other that moving the text between them is as effortless as a flowing river, the babbling of the language as it echoes through the audience. This is a performance with concept, execution and style pouring forth from all.

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AYT Review: The End Of All Miracles

AYT Review: The End Of All Miracles

Also published on A Younger Theatre


They enter in high spirits, partying through life to their wheelchairs. As the music fades, only the remnants of the celebration remain, the leftovers of two lives as they reflect in their twilight years. Both He (Peter McVea) and She (Bridget Wood) have limited memories to cling back to as they debate the choices they made in life – ultimately are memories more important than the life lived itself? The whole performance has a farcical nature to it that juxtaposes the serious conversations had between the married couple. But in the end the concept is too superficial, lacking depth or meaning, which simply results in a disjointed, inconceivable hour of theatre that lacks in a journey, or a direction.

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AYT Review: Counting Stars

AYT Review: Counting Stars

Also published on A Younger Theatre


Sophie (Rebecca Omogbehin) and Abiodun (Joseph Rowe) never directly interact, confined as they are to their separate nightclub toilets. But there is a natural partnership between them, a deep-rooted affection that makes for a set of endearing conversations. The whole production has a light-hearted tone, a gentle comedy that instils empathy on both the workers, before it slowly descends into the nightmare they both wished never to have faced. The build-up is there, but the final climactic moment is lacking in this otherwise affable duologue of characters trying to get by in the world.

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AYT Review: The Shawl

AYT Review: The Shawl

Also published on A Younger Theatre

John (Alec Gray) is a charlatan, a sham. Convincing in his craft, but swindling Miss A (Nicola Peluso) out of her fortune nevertheless. Stricken with grief over the passing of her mother, she is desperate to make contact, seeking out John as a medium in the process. There is a something of the Paul McKenna about Gray’s performance – every movement is measured, purposeful and designed to progress the dialogue, keep us the ruse and stop Miss A from stopping the tricks and gaps in his game. But for the most part, the performance is superficial, movement because of direction and not because of natural characterisation.

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