Tag: Royal Court

Review: Bad Roads

Review: Bad Roads

The pine tree design by Camilla Clarke provides a subtle serenity, juxtaposing the trauma of war in Bad Roads – a series of sparsely connected stories by Natal’ya Vorozhbit around her home country of Ukraine. Six scenes paint the picture, not only of soldiers disenfranchised in a time of civil unrest, but of the women caught up amid the horror and heartache that represents the fallout from the fighting. Vicky Featherstone’s powerful direction supports the actors’ portrayal – a constant rollercoaster of dynamic volume that nevertheless fails to consistently galvanise Vorozhbit’s overall conceptual picture.

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Review: B

Review: B

Guillermo Calderón’s B has an intimate feeling intermingled with an alternative, indie style of live production. Extreme activists Marcela (Aimée-Ffion Edwards) and Alejandra (Danusia Samal) chat with a millennial attitude; dry humour and wit draw out the comedy in Sam Pritchard’s production. It pauses awkwardly yet intentionally, peppered with sharp, monosyllabic grunts and statements of the obvious. The feeling is fresh and new, exactly the reputation that the Royal Court has gleaned for itself.

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Interview: Mark Hadfield and Liz White on Jim Cartwright’s Road

Interview: Mark Hadfield and Liz White on Jim Cartwright’s Road

For more details about Road, please see the accompanying review.


The recent production of Jim Cartwrwight’s Road at the Royal Court made for unmissible viewing  – a blindingly relevant show that gives expression to the inhabitants of an unnamed northern road in Eighties Britain.

After seeing John Tiffany’s production, I sat down with actors Mark Hadfield and Liz White to find out more about the process that went into creating the show:

 

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Review: Road

Review: Road

There is an assumption that Road by Jim Cartwright would feel outdated. Its plot is so geographically and temporally specific that a play about the North East’s experience of the Thatcherite years could have gone the way of Look Back in Anger and feel irrelevant to a modern audience. Under John Tiffany’s direction, Road feels terrifyingly present, and still as necessary after over thirty years since its debut.
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